Canadice – Something to Look Forward to!

Well, it’s the most wonderfully busy time of the year, and I won’t get to visit Canadice, our Lake of the Month, in December! So instead, I am whetting my appetite for an adventure in 2019.

As many locals know, Canadice and Hemlock are the only Finger Lakes with undeveloped shorelines. These lakes serve as the primary source of drinking water for the City of Rochester. Thus the policy to prevent development of the shoreline is to safeguard the water. A side benefit is that nature lovers get a chance to see what this region must have looked like a few hundred years ago – perhaps like stepping into a time machine!

Square Dance at LLCA

The Nature Conservancy (Central and Western New York Chapter) has created a trail to make this happen. Rob’s Trail was built in memory of former board chair Rob van der Stricht, who passed away in 2006. He has been described as “an avid birder, canoeist, and fisherman who carried a broad smile and a pair of binoculars everywhere he went” (https://www.nature.org/en-us/get-involved/how-to-help/places-we-protect/central-robs-trail-preserve/). He had a special attachment to Hemlock and Canadice Lakes, so it is fitting that there is a trail connecting the two lakes dedicated to his memory.

Canadice Loon

The Canadice section of Rob’s Trail was built in 2008, and the Hemlock section was completed in 2016, so now it is possible to hike from one lake to another. According to alltrails.com there are hiking opportunities for all skill levels. There is a flat looped section near the start of the trail, and what looks to be a pretty steep section going down toward the lake. Judging by the reviews, I should try to go during a dry spell – or wear my mud boots!

Canadice Lake and Marc Atkinson

I look forward to seeing the various ecological communities and scenic vistas soon. And I’m really looking forward to a kayak trip on this pristine lake! Won’t you join me?

Thanks to Pat Atkinson for the photos!

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